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Glendora Students Make Gains in English, Fall Slightly in Math

Glendora Unified students scored proficient or advanced in English-language arts, while math scores took a small dip on the 2012 Standardized Testing and Reporting Program.

Glendora Unified School District students made gains in English, while Charter Oak Unified School District Students improved in both English and math, according to the recently released standardized test scores.

The California Department of Education released results in August revealing the percentage of students scoring advanced or proficient in English-language arts and math subjects on the 2012 Standardized Testing and Reporting Program.

Of the 5,726 students tested in Glendora Unified School District, 74 percent scored proficient or advanced in English-language arts, compared to 73 percent in 2011. But in math, scores fell slightly from 67.1 percent proficient or advanced in 2011, to 66.3 percent in 2012.

In Charter Oak Unified School District however, students made gains in both math and English. In 2012, 62 percent of students were proficient or advanced in English, an improvement from 56.9 percent in 2011. Students also made gains in math, jumping from 46.5 percent in 2011, to 51.2 percent in 2012.

Los Angeles County students also saw gains.  Of the more than 1.1 million students tested, 54.4 percent scored proficient or advanced in English-language arts and 49.4 percent in math, according to state data.

In 2011, 51 percent of students in the county scored proficient or advanced in English and 47.9 percent in math.

The gains in test scores in Glendora and Charter Oak school districts and Los Angeles County echoed improvements statewide, according to state Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson.

Statewide figures show 57.2 percent of the 4.7 million students tested scoring advanced or proficient in English-language arts and 51.5 percent in math. 

“In less than a decade, California has gone from having only one student in three score proficient to better than one student in two,” Torlakson said. “That’s nearly 900,000 more students reaching proficiency now than in 2003—a remarkable achievement that represents real, sustained improvements in learning.”

 To read the full report, click here.

EZDuzit September 09, 2012 at 05:09 PM
Let's remember that high scores in standardized tests means nothing to a student personally nor does it insure that they are getting a great education. It simply means that the teachers have done a good job teaching to the test, which is what all Districts want now because higher scores insure more federal funds for the District.
Ian September 09, 2012 at 08:05 PM
Agreed. Teach kids how to take tests. *sigh*
EZDuzit September 09, 2012 at 10:33 PM
I know. It IS disconcerting, Ian!

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